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March 16, 2009
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Make your own Demon Baby by kidoho Make your own Demon Baby by kidoho
I've been seriously meaning to put this up for a long, long time... It was definitely an amazing learning opportunity. If anyone has any questions that I don't address, feel free to ask.

1) I purchased some pipe fittings at Home Depot and fixed them to a wooden lazy susan from Wal-Mart. These will support the weight of the sculpture. I put a "T" joint at the end where the armature will attach to the support.

2) I usually print my reference to scale so that I can measure and compare as I work. This crazed, demonic infant is the brainchild of one Alex Campbell (hence the drawring).

3) Twisting some steel wire to doubly reinforce the character's spine. (At least one of the spines.) I prefer using steel wire to the softer armature wire. I like the strength and resistance it provides when pressing into the clay. Plus you can pick it up at any old hardware store.

4) & 5) Measuring the newly formed spine against the frontal and side reference.

6) Usinging Propoxy, I "weld" the armature to the support

7) Attaching the 2nd spine (again, doubly reinforced)

8) & 9) Again measuring the armature against the reference

10) Using Propoxy I attach the arms and legs of the armature

11) I wrapped the steel wire in a soft, low gauge copper wire. This gives the wire "purchase," helping ensure that the clay sticks to it without slipping. This sculpture also required that bubbles be able to emit from the nostril of one of the heads, hence the copper pipe

12) Filling out the armature with aluminum foil

13) Filling it out with Super Sculpey

14) & 15) Head #1 underway

16) & 17) Additional details added to the head. Please note, that normally I recommend working general to specific when sculpting. In other words, sculpt out the basic shapes first and then slowly and uniformly add the details and refine. I just got a little over excited and jumped right into the details. Not always a good idea. Also, by this point I realized that the armature for the arms was going to get in the way. So I cut them off with the intention of sculpting them separately.

18) Using aluminum foil, I created a baking shield to protect the sculpture's "body." I proceeded to use a heat gun to bake the head. Be careful doing this, because it's pretty easy to burn the clay.

19) - 23) Filling out and refining the 2nd head

24) - 27) sculpting the genitals and feet

28) I created an insertable joint by using two different sizes of square pipe. This enabled me to sculpt the arms separately and easily and securely reattach them to the body

29) the first arm is attached. The second will not be attached until after the sculpture is baked and inserted into the bottle

30) closeup of the insertable joint for the second arm

31) I sculpted the ears separately for the 2nd head and reattached them latter

32) Ears attached as the head is detailed

33) The "wet" sculpture is pretty much complete. It is then baked in the oven at a low temperature, overnight. DO NOT FOLLOW THE BAKING INSTRUCTIONS ON THE BOX. Instead bake your polymer sculpture at around 150 degrees for anywhere from a few hours to overnight, depending on the size of your sculpture/maquette and the thickness of the clay

34) The sculpture is baked and sanded smooth. I had to cut the right ear off of the 1st head so the sculpture would squeeze into the bottle. It was later attached with superglue.

35) Sculpture squeezed into the bottle. The 2nd arm was also attached at this point.

36) - 38) the sculpture submerged in water

The final sculpture: [link]

If anyone ever can name the low-budget, horror film this was featured in, you will be my hero.
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:icontammysoul:
Tammysoul Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Awesome!
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:iconmistwolf4:
Mistwolf4 Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013  Student Artist
Disgusting but awesome.
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:iconstapletonmctavish:
StapletonMcTavish Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
LOVE IT! :D
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:iconsunemoonsong:
sunemoonsong Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2013
SO CREEPY - I love this! I think (and you will have found out) that when you submerge sculpey in water it turns wierd/slimey gooey. This might actually help the effect of your sculpt though. Were I you, I think I might fill that jar with some sort of clear drying epoxy
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:icondtwx:
DTWX Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2009
I pity the woman that gave birth to that sucker. :fusionrock:
Reply
:iconthesasta:
theSASTA Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2009
oh mah gosh Oo

the final "product" is sooooo sick ..... lovin it :clap:

insta:+fav:´d
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:icontelayla:
telayla Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2009
:| GAH!!! I know i know the movie...but I can't rememberrrr...*staaaaare* >.<
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:iconmohain:
Mohain Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2009
wow, amazing. You have talent by the bucket full!
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:iconfairytasia:
fairytasia Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
This is fab! I love seeing how other people work. :clap:

How long did you cure the head for (Step 19) with the heat gun please? I know from experience that polymer clay is extremely fragile at the "between" stages of being "wet" and "cured" if that makes sense? Does the foil protect the other raw clay nicely? I've never thought of using this technique before! I will have to have a play! :D
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:iconx-unit:
X-Unit Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2009  Professional Filmographer
I've always wanted to make one of these, thanks for the steps, they're helpful in knowing the breakdown of it all.
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